Am I Wrong ?

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By Stefan Anderson

The annual free agency period normally creates a domino effect, where the biggest star on the market garners the attention of his desired team, then all of the remaining options follow suit. This year’s was a bit different–more like a complicated game of dominoes. Each team made its moves and the important piece, Kevin Durant, put his block on the game with his signing with the Golden State Warriors.

Durant joins the historic Golden State Warriors after they fell to Lebron James and the Cleveland Cavaliers in the 2016 NBA Finals. Similar to James in 2010, Durant is leaving his beloved Oklahoma City to chase the Larry O’Brien trophy.  In his short career, the Texas product has earned an MVP trophy, multiple scoring titles and Olympic gold medals but still lacks the most important piece to his resume, an NBA championship.

The 2013-14 MVP has been ridiculed for making his decision to join a team that just won 73 games, was a game away from earning their second consecutive championship– a team that his former team the Thunder, was one game away from beating as well. Since 2012, when the Thunder were defeated in the Finals by another super team, the Miami Heat, they have seen the Western Conference Finals twice and been knocked off both times.

Boston’s big three in 2008, the team that birthed this new era of super teams was formulated after Kevin Garnett, the Wolves’ biggest star to date, and Sonics standout Ray Allen forced a trade out of their respective teams and gathered savvy vets to help them meet their goal of winning a championship for Boston. When Lebron James, Dwayne Wade and Chris Bosh teamed up to form the Heatles, it was for the same goal and they accomplished it twice. The lament for Durant can be understood. Ultimately he made the best basketball decision for himself as he stated in his Players Tribune essay.

If you look at it from a larger scale ,each of the last 10 champions in the NBA have all had 2-3 potential Hall of Famers and/or great supporting casts. A special consideration to Cleveland and Golden State because we cannot project where Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson, Draymond Green, Kevin Love or Kyrie Irving will finish, but they will all have a pretty good shot at it.

San Antonio (2014), Miami (2013, 2012), Dallas (2011), LA Lakers (2010, 2009), Boston(2008), San Antonio (2007), Miami (2006).

After looking at those rosters, look how many of the same teams were formed because great players understand that after battling for so many years and not achieving the ultimate goal of winning the NBA Finals, you have join another team to do so. Elder fans scream “Barkley would never have teamed up with Jordan,” but  he did team up Hakeem and Clyde after losing year after year to them.  They say “Magic would never join Bird,” but fail to reference the other teams that won during the 80’s like the Philadelphia 76ers with two NBA MVP’s and the Bad Boy Pistons that collected a ton of Hall-of-Famers on their roster, to dethrone the alpha-dogs, Lakers and Celtics. Also see these Lakers and Celtics.

The Warriors were organically grown into their position, by drafting their core players, by being bad for many years to now climbing out the bottom of the West and becoming a powerhouse. A star like Durant, who is still in his prime after bringing Oklahoma City up from the pits to contender, has been through the struggle and contemplates if they are able to reach that place again in OKC. Rather than pondering that decision, Durant now is in contention for the prized possession. In the current NBA, we often see players as free agents make the choice to get paid the amount desired or play for what they most desire. Kevin Durant made the decision to play for what he most desired.

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